#LearningInTheLoo – Google Drawings

My latest Learning in the Loo poster is all about how to get started with the Google Drawing tool:

Learning in the Loo

As a companion to this week’s how-to-use Google Drawings edition of the Learning in the Loo in a toilet stall near you, I wanted to provide some examples of ways you can use Google Drawings … what can you do with this awesome tool?

Make diagrams for your handouts/tests/slideshows:
Inline image 1
Create an infographic from scratch:
Inline image 3
Create a collage of photos for a custom Google Classroom header image:
Inline image 4
Posters (like this overview of course curriculum) for your classroom walls:
Inline image 5
In addition, an article “10 ways to use Google Drawings for Learning”: http://blog.whooosreading.org/use-google-drawings-for-learning/
Want to give it a try? Go to http://drawings.google.com/create
If you try making a Google Drawing – I’d love for you to show me what you make!

Interested in sharing these posters in the staff washrooms at your school? Here’s the archive.

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

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OAME Leadership Conference #OAMElead

 

I spent Friday at the OAME annual Leadership Conference. It was a great day of learning more about Peter Liljedahl’s Thinking  Classroom framework as well as on the topic of leadership & what it looks like.

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Peter Liljedahl was the keynote speaker. He outlined the (now) 14 elements of his Thinking Classroom framework for us. I had previously sketchnoted about the 11 elements he previously outlined so today I just added the 3 new elements to today’s sketchnote of his keynote:

20171110_100052-01Thinking Classroom

Next we were broken up by panel & experience level w/ Thinking Classroom. I attended the secondary intermediate/advanced session led by Al Overwijk & Jimmy Pai. We were visibly random separated into groups of 3 and given a vertical non-permanent surface to work on the problem of decomposing the number 25 into numbers that summed to 25 and finding the set of these that would generate the greatest product:

We also added to our boards the questions we still have about implementing the Thinking Classroom framework – what we are struggling with. It was a relief for many of us to see that other experienced educators that we respect are struggling with similar questions and strategies:

After lunch Jimmy Pai led a panel discussion on the topic of leadership. I did my best to capture a summary with this sketchnote:

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After the panel were two breakout sessions for the secondary panel; one by Mary Bourassa which involved immersing ourselves as students in a round of Desmos Parabola Slalom and a session about great problems to spark learning by Kyle Pearce & Jon Orr:

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It was a great day of connecting & learning. A big round of 👏applause👏 to OAME president Jill Lazarus and the team for putting the day together:

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

 

Course Packs for the #ThinkingClassroom

I had the pleasure of welcoming Peter Liljedahl to visit my classroom this past week. Peter is the brains behind the Thinking Classroom framework that I’ve been implementing in my classroom over the last few years. While he was in town this week for the OAME Leadership conference he took the time to visit some Thinking Classrooms in the area and I was lucky enough to have him come visit ours. He spent a period with my grade 10 applied students where I was running a problem-based learning task (or 3 Act Math task) to do with solving for the missing angle in a right triangle.

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Peter Liljedahl & Judy Larsen visit

The two most popular elements that most people know about Peter’s Thinking Classroom framework are vertical non-permanent surfaces and visibly random groups. Another of the elements is to have students take meaningful notes after the problem-solving task; giving them time to select, organize & synthesize the ideas they want to keep in their notes. My way of doing this has been to create course packs for each of the courses I teach. Peter shared out this idea during his keynote on Friday and a number of teachers were interested in hearing more about them and seeing examples, so I figure a blog post was in order!

What are my course packs?
They are approximately 10 pages long (1 page per overall expectation for the course) or 5 sheets back to back. There is a box for each of the key terms or skills they need to know (I pull these from the specific expectations listed in the curriculum docs). For my applied classes I usually fill it in with worked examples of the skills, but leave the key terms blank for them to complete (see below right). For my academic classes I usually leave every box blank for students to complete (see below left). I copy & staple one for each student and hand it out at the beginning of the course.

How do we use them?
A place for meaningful notes: After each activity we do, I get my students to take out their course pack & open to whichever page matches the content we covered that day. I give them time to write their own notes based on the student work on the boards, the short notes I may have written on a board or on their boards, and I’ve also suggested mathisfun.com as a good site for definitions at their level. I also encourage them to put both images & words in every box.
A reference document: When groups go up to their boards to solve the day’s problem, one of the 3 members is given the role of bringing the course pack (the other 2 are responsible for scribing and calculating, respectively). Groups will often look through the worked examples if they need some help solving the day’s problem or remembering how to do something. On individual practice days, students often have their course pack out to help them with their practice problems. When students are stuck on a problem, I’ll often ask them to show me where a similar problem is in their course pack & we’ll use that as our starting point as we work together.

Can I see some examples?
Sure can!
Grade 10 applied course pack
Destreamed grade 9 (applied & academic together) course pack:
Grade 10 academic course notes

Still have some questions? Hit me up in the comments below or on Twitter! Have you made some of your own? Share links to your course packs below too!

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

Turning Textbook Questions into Problem-Based Learning Activities

Over the last few years I’ve done my best to create a student-centred Math class using a mix of Dan Meyer’s 3 Act Math strategy, Peter Liljedahl’s Thinking Classroom framework and some other routines like Notice & Wonder mixed in, all in a Pear Deck interactive slideshow.

This week I wanted a problem-based activity on volume so I turned to my version of a textbook; Khan Academy practice sets. I picked a problem that my students will see during their independent practice problems on the Khan Academy website and fleshed it out to create a student-centred activity out of it. Thought I’d share the process with you to show that you can take (sometimes boring) problems right out of a textbook & create a student-centred thinking task for your class.

Here’s the original problem from Khan Academy:Screenshot 2017-10-24 at 8.28.49 AM

So my first task was to find an actual image of a tent and use Google Drawings to add the dimensions as well as the volume to the image:Tent

So this is what I show students to start. I do not tell them yet that I want them to find the height. I have a series of questions we run through every time that I build in a Pear Deck slideshow (where students will be able to answer on their phone & I can display their answers on the board). But you can just ask the questions orally if you like.

Here are the questions/steps:

  1. What do you know / notice?
    They should tell me facts that they know.
    Eg. The tent is the shape of a triangular prism. It has a volume of 70 ft^3.
  2. What do you wonder?
    What questions come to mind?
    Eg. What is the height of the tent? How much canvas is need to make the tent?
  3. Now I tell them the question I want them to explore … for this tent the question was “Can you stand up straight in this tent without hitting your head?”
  4. Estimate:
    – too high
    – too low
    – best estimate
  5. What do you need to
    – measure
    – google
    – calculate
    in order to solve this problem? (plan)
    Whenever possible I bring a hands-on object in that they can physically measure. This time I gave them the measurements of the tent.
  6. Then I send each visibly random group of 3 to their chalkboard or whiteboard section to solve the problem. During this time I’m walking around managing what Peter Liljedahl calls FLOW by giving hints (usually in the form of a question) to those that are stuck and extensions to those that are done the original question (for this tent, how much canvas is needed?). Sometimes this involves calling all groups over to one spot & I do some direct teaching if they need to learn something new or review something to move on.
  7. When all the groups have solved the problem, students return to their seats and I debrief / consolidate the activity by “narrating a story” as Liljedahl says of the student work. I found the “5 practices” article really helpful in learning how to do this.
  8. At this point I reveal the correct answer (needed more if they are taking their own measurements to see how close their answer is to the real answer; for example how tall the lamppost outside actually is after we solve for its height using shadows & similar triangles).
  9. We go back & see who’s best estimate was closest to the actual answer. We celebrate the closest estimate.
  10. Which of the overall expectations from our course did we use today? (reflection)
    This is where the learning goal of the task comes out – at the END. If I say this up front, then it takes away all the student thinking about what math they can use as a tool to solve the problem.
  11. I encourage them to take a photo of any group’s board they wish to save in their notes.
  12. Finally, usually the following day, they do some individual practice using some of the problem sets on Khan Academy.

Hopefully that all makes sense and shows a bit about how you can take a typical textbook or worksheet type word problem & turn it into a more student-centred learning task. If you want to see examples of this type of lesson with student work, have a look at my collection of lessons I have blogged about.

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

Pumpkin Challenge #3ActMath #MFM2P

It all started with a trip to the grocery store where I noticed a giant pumpkin on display & a prize of $50 in gift certificates if you could guess the weight of the pumpkin:20171012_160744-01

I went back a couple of days later to take some measurements of the giant pumpkin, bought 4 smaller pumpkins of varying sizes & we were on our way!

Day 1

Act 1

What do you know / notice?Screenshot 2017-10-26 at 5.49.51 PM

What do you wonder?Screenshot 2017-10-26 at 5.51.09 PM

Estimate the weight of the pumpkin in pounds:
I passed around a 1lb bag of barley that all the student We start with a guess that’s too high (but not silly like 5000 lbs), then too low (but not silly like 1 lb). Then they make their best estimate:Screenshot 2017-10-26 at 5.53.37 PM.png

Then I have them do a turn & talk with their group (visibly random groups of 3) to discuss what they need to a) measure, b) Google c) calculate in order to solve this problem.

Students made a prediction about which characteristic of the pumpkin the weight would depend on most:Screenshot 2017-10-26 at 6.52.09 PM.png

Act 2: 

I revealed some measurements I’d taken of the giant pumpkin:Dimensions

We had 4 pumpkins of various sizes at stations around the room with a scale to measure weight and rulers & measuring tapes. Groups were sent to their vertical non-permanent surfaces to begin collecting & recording data about any measurements they thought they might need for the pumpkins to help predict the giant’s weight:

Groups recorded measurements and started calculations for volume, etc. in order predict the giant pumpkin’s weight:20171018_143719

At this point we hit the end of the class period. Some groups had some volume calculations but none of them had got to (or really thought of) creating a table or a graph of weight depending on another variable to make a prediction.

Day 2

I was away this day & so students had the period to do some independent practice on Volume & Surface area word problems on Khan Academy.

Day 3

I wanted students to graph weight VS diameter, weight VS surface area, & weight VS volume. So I created a Desmos Activity to walk them through that process:Screenshot 2017-10-27 at 10.57.39 AM.png

I provided students with the raw data they would need (as they had already worked on these types of SA & Volume calculations the previous period – today’s learning goal was all about the linear & quadratic relations between different variables):Screenshot 2017-10-27 at 11.00.16 AM

They found the line of best fit and quadratic curve of best fit. We had a class discussion about which one fit the data better … quadratic!Screenshot 2017-10-27 at 11.03.29 AM

They they used that curve to predict the weight of the giant pumpkin based on diameter:Screenshot 2017-10-27 at 11.05.01 AM

I walked them through that first set of tasks step by step as a whole class making sure everyone understood. Then I turned the Desmos Activity to student-paced mode & let them continue the same graphing tasks for weight VS surface area & then volume (although many of my students gave up working on it once I was no longer leading the class through the activity slide by slide).

Each student had filled out an entry slip for the pumpkin contest at the end of day 1, and I allowed them to adjust their entry if they wanted based on today’s work. I then dropped off all of their entries after school:
Screenshot 2017-10-27 at 11.25.46 AM

Day 4

Started class by revealing the weight of the giant pumpkin.
DRUM ROLL PLEASE . . . 166 pounds!!!

I then presented them with a the 3 models we created, each showing the giant pumpkin’s actual weight as an orange dot & asked which model was the best predictor for the giant pumpkin:Choose a modelScreenshot 2017-10-27 at 11.42.02 AM

I finished by having the students drag dots to any Math from our course that we used over the last few days with this activity:Screenshot 2017-10-27 at 11.44.23 AM

Students had the rest of the period to do some individual practice on “Graphing linear functions word problems” on Khan Academy.

My folder with everything for this activity can be found here. The unassociated files are the Pear Deck interactive slide decks.

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

Banquet Hall problem #MFM2P #PBL

This is my 2nd or 3rd time doing this activity, but hadn’t yet blogged about it. So here goes … I made lots of changes, even from one period to the next.

Prompt:Spartan Banquet Hall.png

Notice-Wonder-Estimate:

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Screenshot 2017-10-13 at 3.39.27 PM

Screenshot 2017-10-13 at 3.40.35 PM

Solve:
At your boards (whiteboard / chalkboard) in groups of 2-3 randomly assigned (VNPS & VRG).

Most groups started calculating the cost per person for each teacher. I stressed to them multiple times that all 3 teachers were paying along the same formula or “price plan”. They really struggled with how that could be. In first period there was 1 group whose board had a table on it & they had started using 1st differences to calculate the rate of change. I called all the groups over & led a discussion about the strategy and asked about what sort of deposit (a cost for 0 people) might have to be made by the teachers & sent all the groups back to continue, strongly urging them to explore the table idea. In 3rd period, none of the groups started the table, so I called all the groups over to some spare board & said “here’s something I saw in 1st period” & proceeded to have the same conversation with them.

Here are their boards:

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We got to the point on day 1 where everyone solved for the cost for 150 guests. Time ran out, & bell rung.

Between periods 1 & 3 today I added some extra slides & questions to my slide deck to make it better.

Day 2:

Yesterday I added a slide asking students to graph the 3 points from the original data set in the original prompt. Today we started on that slide in Pear Deck :Screenshot 2017-10-13 at 3.54.27 PM.png
I asked them if this was linear or nonlinear. Why? In 1st period this also resulted in a conversation about 1st differences when the x values don’t have a constant increase.
I asked if the line of best fit would pass through the origin?

I then sent groups to their boards with the task of using Desmos to find the equation for the line of best fit . Their boards:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Once they had done a linear regression to find the equation, I asked them to use their equation to solve for the number of guests I invited if my party cost $3545 at the banquet hall. I coached a few groups through the proper format in which to show their work when solving an equation.

The rest of the period was dedicated to individual practice on a Khan Academy problem set called “Slope intercept equation from graph“.

Find the whole lesson here (the unassociated file is Pear Deck).

As a final note, this whole problem-based teaching can be hard for the student to grasp sometimes. Today this happened:

How do you handle it when students question your teaching skills or pedagogy? Let me know in the comments below!

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

 

 

 

Keyboard Shortcuts #LearningInTheLoo

This week’s Learning in the Loo edition is up at my school. It’s all about keyboard shortcuts inspired by & sourced from Matt Miller‘s recent blog post on the topic. Have a look!

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The archive of all the Learning in the Loo editions I’ve put together are available here.

Which keyboard shortcut do you find the most useful? Have I missed any? Leave yours in the comments below!

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

Groups of 3 with a 4th Desk Free #VRG

Yesterday,  my students were working on their independent practice problems on solving similar triangles on Khan Academy. As I reflected at the end of class, it was so obvious to me how important it is to have a seat free at each group’s desks so that I can sit with them to help them one-on-one. And while that seems obvious, I’m sure I’m not the only one that lets myself be lured into the temptation of sitting at my teacher desk while students work & saying “come over to me if you have any questions!” meanwhile I can shoot off an email or two that need sending. And of course a couple of students will come over to ask me something. But so many others will not leave their seat. Might not even get any work done at all & I won’t notice. Some just can’t get started because they have no idea where to start. So they’ll make it look like they’re working, but at the end of 75 minutes they haven’t done a single practice problem.

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Each group has either 4 desks or 3 desk + a stool.

Even on independent practice days, I have students sit in “visibly random groups” by giving out playing cards as they enter class. New partners, new seat every day.

So yesterday as my students started on their practice problems, I moved from group to group, helping students that asked for help. I also sat down to work through a question together with students that hadn’t even started yet (not because they’re being oppositional – but they just don’t know where to start!). Here’s a short video with my reflection on that 4th seat at each group:

Or you can view the video here also.

How do you make sure your quiet, reluctant learners get the same one-on-one help from you as those that self-advocate a little louder?

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

Learning in the Loo: Google Classroom edition

Today I prepared the year’s first edition of Learning in the Loo for my school all about what’s new in Google Classroom this year. The topic was inspired by the most recent episode of the Google Teacher Tribe podcast (worth subscribing to if you’re into podcasts!).

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– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)