About mslwheeler

Math teacher at Ridgemont High School, OCDSB. Twitter: @wheeler_laura Class website: misswheeler.pbworks.com

Banquet Hall problem #MFM2P #PBL

This is my 2nd or 3rd time doing this activity, but hadn’t yet blogged about it. So here goes … I made lots of changes, even from one period to the next.

Prompt:Spartan Banquet Hall.png

Notice-Wonder-Estimate:

Screenshot 2017-10-13 at 3.38.20 PM.png

Screenshot 2017-10-13 at 3.39.27 PM

Screenshot 2017-10-13 at 3.40.35 PM

Solve:
At your boards (whiteboard / chalkboard) in groups of 2-3 randomly assigned (VNPS & VRG).

Most groups started calculating the cost per person for each teacher. I stressed to them multiple times that all 3 teachers were paying along the same formula or “price plan”. They really struggled with how that could be. In first period there was 1 group whose board had a table on it & they had started using 1st differences to calculate the rate of change. I called all the groups over & led a discussion about the strategy and asked about what sort of deposit (a cost for 0 people) might have to be made by the teachers & sent all the groups back to continue, strongly urging them to explore the table idea. In 3rd period, none of the groups started the table, so I called all the groups over to some spare board & said “here’s something I saw in 1st period” & proceeded to have the same conversation with them.

Here are their boards:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We got to the point on day 1 where everyone solved for the cost for 150 guests. Time ran out, & bell rung.

Between periods 1 & 3 today I added some extra slides & questions to my slide deck to make it better.

Day 2:

Yesterday I added a slide asking students to graph the 3 points from the original data set in the original prompt. Today we started on that slide in Pear DeckΒ :Screenshot 2017-10-13 at 3.54.27 PM.png
I asked them if this was linear or nonlinear. Why? In 1st period this also resulted in a conversation about 1st differences when the x values don’t have a constant increase.
I asked if the line of best fit would pass through the origin?

I then sent groups to their boards with the task of using Desmos to find the equation for the line of best fitΒ . Their boards:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Once they had done a linear regression to find the equation, I asked them to use their equation to solve for the number of guests I invited if my party cost $3545 at the banquet hall. I coached a few groups through the proper format in which to show their work when solving an equation.

The rest of the period was dedicated to individual practice on a Khan Academy problem set called “Slope intercept equation from graph“.

Find the whole lesson here (the unassociated file is Pear Deck).

As a final note, this whole problem-based teaching can be hard for the student to grasp sometimes. Today this happened:

How do you handle it when students question your teaching skills or pedagogy? Let me know in the comments below!

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

 

 

 

Advertisements

Keyboard Shortcuts #LearningInTheLoo

This week’s Learning in the Loo edition is up at my school. It’s all about keyboard shortcuts inspired by & sourced from Matt Miller‘s recent blog post on the topic. Have a look!

Learning in the Loo (1).png

The archive of all the Learning in the Loo editions I’ve put together are available here.

Which keyboard shortcut do you find the most useful? Have I missed any? Leave yours in the comments below!

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

Groups of 3 with a 4th Desk Free #VRG

Yesterday, Β my students were working on their independent practice problems on solving similar triangles on Khan Academy. As I reflected at the end of class, it was so obvious to me how important it is to have a seat free at each group’s desks so that I can sit with them to help them one-on-one. And while that seems obvious, I’m sure I’m not the only one that lets myself be lured into the temptation of sitting at my teacher desk while students work & saying “come over to me if you have any questions!” meanwhile I can shoot off an email or two that need sending. And of course a couple of students will come over to ask me something. But so many others will not leave their seat. Might not even get any work done at all & I won’t notice. Some just can’t get started because they have no idea where to start. So they’ll make it look like they’re working, but at the end of 75 minutes they haven’t done a single practice problem.

20170919_080609

Each group has either 4 desks or 3 desk + a stool.

Even on independent practice days, I have students sit in “visibly random groups” by giving out playing cards as they enter class. New partners, new seat every day.

So yesterday as my students started on their practice problems, I moved from group to group, helping students that asked for help. I also sat down to work through a question together with students that hadn’t even started yet (not because they’re being oppositional – but they just don’t know where to start!). Here’s a short video with my reflection on that 4th seat at each group:

Or you can view the video here also.

How do you make sure your quiet, reluctant learners get the same one-on-one help from you as those that self-advocate a little louder?

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

Learning in the Loo: Google Classroom edition

Today I prepared the year’s first edition of Learning in the Loo for my school all about what’s new in Google Classroom this year. The topic was inspired by the most recent episode of the Google Teacher Tribe podcast (worth subscribing to if you’re into podcasts!).

Learning in the Loo (1).png

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

What drives the Collective Knowing & Learning of the #MTBoS community?

#MTBoS: The Math Twitter Blog-o-sphere.

Do you participate? Contribute? Creep? Math teachers seem to have carved out a particular niche using Twitter & blogs to share & learn from each other in order to better our teaching. Teachers in other subject areas are often wondering, why doesn’t this exist for my subject? How exactly does one instigate & support a #MTBoS for a different subject area? Why are so many Math teachers so engaged in this professional learning community via social media?

Judy Larsen & Peter Liljedahl put together a research paper that looks into some of the ways that the #MTBoS promotes interactions & learning among those teachers participating in it. And I sketchnoted their article:

MTBoS.jpeg

Abstract
Stimulating sustainable mathematics teacher collaboration can be challenging in many commonly found professional development contexts. Despite this, an unprompted, unfunded, unmandated, and largely unstudied mathematics teacher community has emerged where mathematics teachers use social media to communicate about the teaching and learning of mathematics. This paper presents an analysis of one episode where teachers engage in a prolonged exchange about responding to a common mathematical error. Analytical tools drawn from complexity theory are used to explain moments of productivity. Results indicate that enough redundancy and diversity among members is necessary to make conversations productive. Identified sources of redundancy indicate the ‘taken-as-shared’ values of this group.

Full article available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/316994276_Exploring_generative_moments_of_interaction_between_mathematics_teachers_on_social_media [accessed Jul 27, 2017].

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

Push-Back to Student-Centred Learning. #sketchnote

I’ve often said that I would hate to be a learner in my own classroom. I was a very strong student in high school. I didn’t need to be in class; if I missed class I would read the section in the book & do the homework problems & learn it myself. I made beautiful pages of copied notes from the teacher’s board and was able to understand the content as I copied. I did not enjoy group work; hated relying on partners to do their bit. I am still the first person to roll my eyes at ice breakers in a staff meeting or workshop.

And yet, my classroom is the opposite of this. I ask my students to work in groups, beginning with a getting to know you question every day since we change groups daily. I don’t give many notes, rather I give students time to summarize their new learning in their course packs. We do problem-based learning with hands-on components whenever possible. This is a far cry from the teacher notes followed by homework problems routine from my day.

But many to most of my students are not able to learn that way (although a small number of them are & would prefer a more traditional teaching style). Most can’t understand the notes they’re copying down because they’re too busy copying.Β (Have you ever asked your students if they’re able to listen to the teacher while they copy notes? My students tell me straight up that they are not able).

So over the years I have searched for strategies & pedagogical methods that would transform my classroom to be a better learning environment for my students. But my students haven’t always been eager about my methods; group work, problem solving, critical thinking, feedback separated from marks, etc. The workings of our Math classroom are so different from their experience so far that they sometimes push back. And for many teachers, this push back stops them from continuing to pursue different teaching methods. For example, I’ve had students say “you don’t teach us!”. But upon drilling down further as to what they mean, it becomes clear what they really mean, is you don’t write long, detailed notes on the board to copy down. They think that is teaching and don’t view the careful orchestration of a student-centred classroom as teaching also.

My advice to teachers: keep trying! Don’t let that student (or parent) push-back stop you from pursuing new & innovative teaching methods. It’s normal – it happens to all of us! But eventually students (most anyway) get past it. Alice Keeler shared this great article entitled “NAVIGATING THE BUMPY ROAD TO STUDENT-CENTERED INSTRUCTION” by Felder & Brent that likens the student push-back during student-centred teaching to the 8 stages of grief. I love sharing the article with teachers that are frustrated by students that are reacting negatively when they try to transform their classroom to a student-centred learning environment. So to make the ideas even more shareable, I put together a sketchnote version:

Student centred instruction.jpeg

But I really do encourage you to read the whole article as the authors go on to explain some suggestions as to how to mitigate the push-back, such as sharing with students the reasoning behind the methods, and modelling & establishing criteria for the successful use of the critical thinking skills expected of students.

I’ll finish by including a few of the tweets from other teachers on the topic:

What push-back have you experienced in your classroom and how have you dealt with it?

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

Captive Audience: #LearningInTheLoo

Do you ever read a great article or blog post and think I HAVE to share this with my colleagues! So you email everybody the link & say you have to read this. And then maybe 1 or 2 people actually read it?

I find so many great things on Twitter & blogs (#MTBoS) that I want to share with my colleagues, but they often don’t have (or make) the time to check them out. So when I happened upon a tweet about Learning in the Loo I thought it was genius – a captive audience!

So I have made it a habit to create & post a new Learning in the Loo 11×17″ poster in each staff toilet in our school every 1 or 2 weeks this semester. I curate the amazing things I learn about online & turn them into quick read how-tos or ideas to read while you … “go”. And it just occured to me that I should have been posting them to my blog as I made them. But now you can get a whole whack of them at once and next year I’ll try to remember to post them as I make them.

The whole collection so far can be found here with printing instructions.
Feel free to make a copy (File –> make a copy). Also the sources of images & ideas are in the notes of the doc above too.

Here they are:

Learning in the Loo Assessment FeedbackLearning in the Loo Cell Phone Work Life BalanceLearning in the Loo EdPuzzleLearning in the Loo Adobe Spark VideoLearning in the Loo TwitterLearning in the Loo Google ClassroomLearning in the Loo Grouping StrategiesLearning in the Loo KahootLearning in the Loo Google Docs

What would you share in your school’s first Learning In The Loo poster?

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

Running VS Walking Headstart #MPM1D #MFM2P #3ActMath

A month ago or so I read a post by Mr. Hogg about his Fast Walker activity. I thought it would be a great way to introduce linear systems graphically to my combined grade 9 math class before the end of the semester. I also did this activity with my Grade 10 applied students – next semester I’ll use it as an introduction to systems graphically with them earlier in the course.

What turned out to be super awesome is that a student in my grade 9 class just won gold at OFSAA last week! So I tweaked Mr. Hogg’s activity to use Joe’s winning data in our problem. I also structured the activity to be a 3 act math task. Here’s what we did:

Act 1: Notice – Wonder – Estimate

Runner Speed (1)

What do you know / notice?Capture

What do you wonder?Capture

If you want to cross the finish line at the same time as Joe, what distance head start will you need?Capture.JPG

Act 2: Measure & Solve

Capture.JPG

Students were told they had to stay in class when taking measurements; my idea being to force them to time themselves walking over shorter distances (the length of our classroom) and then use that to model their speed for this problem given. Each student had to calculate their own head start:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Act 3: Check & Reflect

We went out to our 400m track and students measured out their starting position. They staggered themselves according to their calculation (photo below – tried to take video but my phone battery died). Most students were around 100m before the finish line (~300m head start). We counted down & Joe started running & the class started walking. I so wish I’d gotten the video because it was awesome how close they all finished to each other!DB6mp2rXgAE8O55

I had my grade 9s graph their walk & Joe’s run on the same grid. Here are their graphs overlaid on top of each other:
Capture
Most students had the right idea, and I talked to a few with incorrect graphs individually but when I look at this overlay now I can see that I missed helping a few students correct their work 😦

We discussed which line was partial variation & which one was direct. I then introduced the language of “linear system” and “point of intersection”. My 2P class time to create an equation for each line also.

The next time I try this, I’d like to add an individual follow up question such as if you only had a 50m head start, at what distance would you & Joe meet? At what time would that be?

Here are my files for this activity (the unassociated one is the Pear Deck slideshow).

Tech Tip: Did you know you can add the same Google Doc/file to multiple folders without copying it? I didn’t until recently. It was useful for this lesson because I wanted to have it in the folder for each of the 2 classes I did the lesson with! Once you’ve clicked on the file just press Shift+Z :Capture.JPG

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

Tree Height #3ActMath #MPM2D #MFM2P

Here is a tree height 3 act math activity I do for right angled trigonometry with both my 2D & 2P classes. The screenshots below were taken from my 2P class this semester.

Act 1: Setup

IMG_1636

Some noticings:IMG_2298

Some wonderings:IMG_2299

We do some turn & talk guesses for “too low” & “too high” then we go back to Pear Deck for our best estimate:IMG_2300

Act 2: Measure & Solve

Students downloaded a clinometer app onto one of the phones in their group.

Here are photos of last year’s group out measuring:

Up to the “vertical non-permanent surfaces”Β to solve in their “visibly random groups”:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Act 3: Consolidation

This is one activity I don’t have a true act 3 for – I don’t know the actual height of this tree 😦 I led a class discussion going over the solutions from various groups. We discussed the fact that trig would not find the whole tree height & that groups needed to add the height of the person up to eye level to their value found using trig. I sent groups back to their boards to adjust their solution for this (final photos above).

The whole activity, including the Pear Deck file, can be found here.

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)

#3ActMath – What is it?

I learned about a great tool this past weekend at the Ontario Summit; Adobe Spark video. A huge shoutout to Rushton Hurley for the introduction to this tool. It’s a super fast & easy way to combine photos, videos & text and narrate over top of it to create a seamless professional looking video.

I tried my hand and created one about 3ActMath lesson style. Give it a watch & let me know what you think:

– Laura Wheeler (Teacher @ Ridgemont High School, OCDSB; Ottawa, ON)